Digital Humanities

Collaborating with the Invisible Cohort of #dhfellows

When I first ┬áread Adrianne Wadewitz’s blog post, A Day in the Life of a Digital Humanities Postdoc, I was excited. My first thought was: there are others out there! Adrianne is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at Occidental College and works in a similar environment as I do, and with a similar… Read more »

Digital Humanities

Costing Out a Small Digital Humanities Lab

In conversations with fellow digi-dorks, it became clear I was looking at this wrong. To answer the question, how much does it cost to start a small digital humanities lab; first, consider the most expensive element: personnel. The other costs: a few computers, web-hosting, software, and furniture are relatively inexpensive. The other big issue, and… Read more »

Digital Humanities

Anvil Academic’s Built Upon Series

Build it. Publish it. Share it. Invite scholars to build upon it. Anvil Academic’s first publishing venture is the Built Upon series. The “series encourages authors to investigate and invigorate pre-existing digital tools and collections in developing their own scholarly arguments or pedagogical projects.” Digital projects suffer from lack of attention and being lost in… Read more »

Digital Humanities

Share Your Digital Projects

Digital projects foster ownership. Whether you’re a PI, a collaborator, or a student worker whom transcribes or scans documents, chances are you feel proud of the work you’ve done. That part of the project exists because of your hard work. A thoughtful PI usually includes a credits page that resembles the credits of a movie,… Read more »

Digital Humanities

How to Become a Digital Humanities Swiss Army Knife

Alright, we got it. The market stinks. There’s never enough time. The digital divide is growing. And if you’re looking to jump the chasm to the marketable promised land, it’s time to be a digital humanist. <bracket_that type=”word”> First, start putting words between brackets. This can begin through emails to colleagues. <yikes>Just saw a student… Read more »

Digital Humanities

Neatline

This month I’m attending a workshop on Neatline. The software works with Omeka and seems like it may be a low barrier mapping tool. Right now, I’m imagining it as geo-referencing software that allows users to more easily create maps and display information. Have you used Neatline, and if so, what was your experience?